Angebote zu "Hotter" (4 Treffer)

Big Jay McNeely - Big Jay In 3-D (LP)
17,95 € *
zzgl. 3,99 € Versand

(King) 12 tracks - Re-issue of the original 1959 ´King´ LP album Big Jay McNeely, the greatest jazz sensa-tion to come out of California since Lionel Hampton, is known to his thousands of fol-lowers as the ´Go! Go! Go!´ boy. He plays a powerful lot of tenor saxophone. In fact, he has been known to devote 45 minutes to blowing hot and sweet in one number. It left him exhausted. A jazz devotee, Big Jay has studied under modern music greats. He has become the new jazz Pied Piper of teen-agers; has been called ´the greatest jazz artist since Louis Armstrong,´ and also, ´California´s hottest showman-saxophonist.´ As Big Jay himself tells it, ´I first came to Los Angeles on April 29, 1927. I did not come there to get into the movies. I just came there to be born.´ His was a musical family. Both parents and two brothers, Robert and Dillard, were musical. But Big Jay was 16 before he ´inherited´ his first musical instru-ment. While attending grade school, Big Jay thought it would be nice to take up the trom-bone. But Papa McNeely took inventory of the bankroll and decided the world would have to do without Big Jay´s trombone toot-ing. So Big Jay went on to Jefferson High School, majored in music (harmony and the-ory), but couldn´t get an instrument to play. Brother Robert had inherited an alto saxo-phone from a cousin. Since he now was em-ployed, he decided to go out and splurge on a tenor. That´s how Big Jay came to ´inherit´ the alto. Shortly thereafter, Uncle Sam sum-moned Robert, and his parting gift to Big Jay was his treasured tenor. That Big Jay made good use of the gift is musical history. He was a 16 year old high school student at the time. He and the tenor became the best of friends. Within six months he organized a 15 piece dance band, ´The Earls Of 44´, after Fatha Earl Hines. Withal, Big Jay lacked confidence in his musical prowess. He appeared in an amateur contest as a comedian—and was hooted off. Hurt, but mostly mad, Big Jay came back the next week. This time he had his sax along. He took second prize. The third week he won first prize with his torrid tenor. Family hardship actually started Big Jay off on his march to fame. His brothers were in the Army. His mother was a complete in-valid. Then his father took sick and couldn´t work. Big Jay had to find a job. He formed a five man combo and went before the Union board for special dispensation. It was grant-ed, and Big Jay went to work at the Club Savoy, but because he was under-age, he had to leave the club between sessions and remain outside as long as he was off the stand. He finished high school while playing such clubs as the Rendezvous, Zanzibar, and Last word. Next thing he knew he was a hit on wax. By 1949, at the age of 22, he was on the national popularity and best-selling lists. H is records have been favorites in pop-ular sales and have been spun in juke boxes and by disk jockeys from coast to coast. Recently, Big Jay´s ´Jazz Concerts´ at Shrine and Olympic Auditoriums in Los An-geles attracted thousands of Southern Cali-fornia teen-agers, who scream, shout, stomp and chant ´Go! Go! Go!´ in mounting ex-citement to his rhythmic rompings. His agon-ized blue notes left them limp, disheveled and white with exhaustion as the perspiring Big Jay sank to his knees, played from a jack-knife position and finally stretched out on his back, still torturing his tenor. Most of Big Jay´s fans are of high school and college age, but the older folks find his music contagious, too. At the Shrine jazz con-certs, one woman came night after night and sat there, just knitting placidly. ´Oh, I feel it, all right´, she said, ´I feel it. It´s all inside.´

Anbieter: Bear Family Recor...
Stand: 07.06.2019
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Various - Red Hot Rockabilly Part.1 (CD)
16,95 €
Rabatt
9,95 € *
zzgl. 3,99 € Versand

(Disky) 30 tracks The Hottest Sounds from the IMPERIAL/LIBERTY Record Company Catalogues. America, that extraordinary melting pot of music and home to a number of musical eccentrics and oddballs, was, by the 1920´s, already producing music, that, in anyone´s terminology, would be called ´Hot´. Hot Jazz came up the Mississippi from New Orleans and permeated it´s way across America, followed by the Bluesmen and the Hillbilly String Bands, all of whom were to make their mark during this very important period of musical experimentation. The 1930´s saw the small Jazz Bands grow into large travelling, Swing Bands, the Bluesmen forming small, Juke Joint, Combos and the String Bands growing into much larger and louder, Western Swing Bands. There was an evergrowing dance public at this time, consequently venues grew larger and the music needed to be louder. Sadly, the advent of the Great Depression resulted in enormous cutbacks in the recording budgets and in the disbanding of innumerable Bands and Combos, due to lack of work. World War Two did not help much either, with a long term ban on shellac usage, but, throughout History, people at war, have always demanded entertainment and consequently, work for Bands/Combos/Singers of all styles increased dramatically. After the War was over, America went back to work with a vengeance and the whole entertainment scene began to grow at a tremendous pace. In all forms of Music, stylists were appearing and attracting their own recording contracts and artists, as opposed to being slaves to the world of sheet music, as artists had mostly been before the war. Independent record companies began to appear catering, once again, to all forms of music in all styles. Probably one of the key points to the success of ´Hot´ music, since the 1920´s was the ´Backbeat´. That crack on the snare drum quite simply had kept millions of people dancing around the world and has continued to do so. After the War, the music became louder again -the ´American Dream´ was rearing its head on the Horizon and the people wanted to loosen their inhibitions just a little more. Electric guitars were introduced fully into Country Music/Western Swing/Jazz/Blues/Dance Band Music/Rhythm ´n´ Blues during and after the War, creating a completely different musical energy level, from which there was no turning back. At the same time, despite segregation in many parts of America, at this time, both White and Black Musicians and Vocalists were listening intently to each others styles and rhythms and began ´borrowing´ ideas for their recording dates and ´Live´ shows. By the turn of the Half Century, the Rock ´n´ Roll melting pot was boiling and Blues/Country/Gospel/Latin/Hillbilly and Jazz fused together was beginning to produce some astounding records for the time. America still, however, needed a Rudolf Valentino style icon to lead it away from the ultra staid ´Pop´ music fare that trumpeted out of the Radio Speakers of Middle Class Homes everyday and dominated the ´Pop´ Charts, almost permanently. Finally, the Icon was found, in a small studio in Memphis, Tennessee, where, on July 5th. 1954, Elvis Presley made his first record ´That´s all right mama/Blue moon of Kentucky´ for the fledgling Sun Record Company. Presley confused everyone, because radio listeners were not sure if he was black or white, so, initially, the record sold to both markets and took off like a tornado through the South creating a whole new era, where Country Boys threw away their fiddles and banjos, bought guitars, grew sideburns, sported ducktails checked out their hip swinging potential in the bedroom mirror and, between them, recorded thousands of gut-wrenching 45´s, desperately attempting to emulate the ´Hillbilly Cat´, as he blazed a path across the USA, laying down some all timeclassics for Sun Records, before moving on to permanent stardom with RCA Victor and a Hotel of Lonely Hearts! Rockabilly, one step on from Hillbilly Boogie, borrowed generously from Blues/Country/Gospel/R ´n´ B and even Bluegrass, to create those echo laden sounds, yet, despite an initial burst of popularity, it only really lasted commercially for about 1 /2 to 2 years. A slew of Independent Labels certainly were responsible for some of the greatest Rockabilly Music ever recorded, but the Majors were not slow to jump into the situation and sign up a strong collection of pulsating teen angst of the time. Imperial Records and, to a marginally lesser extent, Liberty Records were

Anbieter: Bear Family Recor...
Stand: 14.05.2019
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Martin Böttcher - Die Halbstarken (Teenage Wolf...
16,95 €
Rabatt
9,95 € *
zzgl. 3,99 € Versand

1-CD DigiPac (6-seitig) mit 52-seitigem Booklet, 28 Einzeltitel. Spieldauer ca. 55 Minuten. Zwei Filmklassiker mit Horst Buchholz Diese beiden deutschen Filmklassiker sind aus einem Guss und deshalb die ideale Kombination, um auf einer CD veröffentlicht zu werden. Will Tremper schrieb sowohl die Erzählungen und Drehbücher, Georg Tressler führte Regie und Horst Buchholz war der Hauptdarsteller in diesen beiden in Berlin angesiedelten Jugendproblem-Filmen der fünfziger Jahre. Besonders ´Die Halbstarken´ lehnte sich an amerikanische Vorbilder wie ´Der Wilde´ (The Wild One) an, erhielt Auszeichnungen und entwickelte sich zu einem internationalen Erfolg. Wer den Komponisten Martin Böttcher nur in Verbindung mit seinen Karl - May -Filmmusiken kennt, wird hier eine Überraschung erleben. Martin Böttcher war am Anfang seiner Karriere auch leidenschaftlicher Jazzer, der für ´Die Halbstarken´ so exzellente Musiker wie Horst Fischer, Fatty George, Ernst Mosch, Rolf Ahrens oder Hans ´James´ Last um sich scharen konnte. ´Und dann ging die Post ab´, sagt er noch heute mit Begeisterung ... und es entstanden Themen wie Sissy Blues, Mister Martin´s Mop, Swing Party, In Chicago, Mr. Martin´s Riff, Groggy und viele andere. Diese CD dokumentiert die beiden unvergessenen Filme und bei den hervorragenden Original-Soundtracks erwacht von neuem der Charme jener Zeit. Szenen wie der fetzige Tanz von Horst Buchholz mit Karin Baal oder Hottes Spaziergänge mit Barbara Frey waren filmische und musikalische Highlights. ´Die Halbstarken´ Mr. Martin´s Mop (Titelmusik) - Musik ohne Titel (In der Eisdiele) - Swing Party - In Chicago - Mr. Martin´s Mop (Im ´Espresso´) - Außer dir gibt´s doch nichts - Leider gut (Autofahrt) - Mario und Helga - Das Verhör der Gang - Warten - Der Postraub - Immer elegant (Die Flucht zum Unterschlupf am See) - Sissy-Blues - Das Ende (Nach dem Schuss) ´Endstation Liebe´ Endstation Liebe (Titelmusik) - Mr. Martin´s Riff (Tumult in der Catcherhalle) - Mecky und Christa bummeln - Erster Flirt - Traumfahrt (Auf dem Autofriedhof) - Mecky küsst Christa - Auf dem Weg zur Party - EinThron für Christa - Mecky und Christa kochen Kaffee - Der alte Lehrer (Kaffeeplausch) - Kartenspiel mit Happy-End - Groggy (Mecky bei Anni) - Mecky denkt an Christa - Bonus Track: Endstation Liebe (EP-Version)

Anbieter: Bear Family Recor...
Stand: 08.03.2019
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Tandyn Almer - Along Comes Tandyn
26,95 € *
zzgl. 3,99 € Versand

(2013/SUNDAZED) 15 tracks 1965/66 - Gatefold/Klappcover. vinyl The Lost Pop-Psych Classic Of The ´60´s! The late, great composer/pianist/producer/MENSA member Tandyn Almer first emerged in pop culture consciouness as the writer of the 1966 smash single by The Association, ´´Along Comes Mary.´´ Its seemingly innocuous lyric about a girl became a point of intense scrutiny as rumors of marijuana references wafted through a society fraught with generational conflict. One of those listeners on the far side of the gap, Leonard Bernstein, recognized the song´s musical sophistication and deft wordplay as something noteworthy. Consequently, Bernstein chose Almer as an interview subject for his CBS News documentary Inside Pop: The Rock Revolution, which aired on Tuesday, April 25th, 1967. It was a groundbreaking special, with Almer´s cool media attitude working well to calm the controversial storm surrounding the movement that would soon blossom into the Summer of Love. If this were a Hollywood film script, Almer would have then been catapulted to the upper echelons of pop stardom, rubbing elbows with hottest hitmakers of the day. Instead, while he released one single of his own, ´´Degeneration Gap,´´ and wrote and produced several more pop-psyche gems, Almer´s career path took a much more enigmatic route. He did collaborate with fellow melodic savant Brian Wilson, most notably as the co-writer of ´´Sail On Sailor,´´ and published a songbook of his new compositions. In service of these songs, a 15-track demo LP was recorded and pressed in a small quantity by his publisher, Davon Music, to distribute to potential recording clients. Through the years, word of this LP spread through the collecting world, its legend increasing with each telling and its price increasing with each resale for those lucky enough to find a copy. Included within this demonstration disc is the nasty, buzzing fuzztone and haunting vocals of The Purple Gang´s version of ´´Bring Your Own Self Down,´´ the engaging Pop feel of ´´Find Yourself,´´ the smooth groove of ´´Anything You Want´´ and ´´Victims of Chance´´ (recorded as an instrumental by L.A. jazz combo The Afro Blues Quintet), along with the straight-ahead Folk-Rock of ´´About Where Love Is´´ and ´´Sunset Strip Soliloquy´´ -- the latter about the atmosphere which led to the demonstrations of late ´66. At long last, Sundazed Music has rescued this ´´holy grail´´ album and presents the first-ever commercial release of Along Comes Tandyn. A stunning collection covering a wide stylistic range, it is a resounding confirmation Almer´s harmonic genius. After one listen, you´ll understand why Tandyn was always the smartest guy in the room.

Anbieter: Bear Family Recor...
Stand: 07.06.2019
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