Angebote zu "Affection" (2 Treffer)

Various - Ve Day - The Vocalists (CD)
16,95 € *
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(Empress) 25 tracks. original recordings Just picture the scene. The British people are celebrating VE day with a will. Throughout the country people are gathering together for street parties, pubs and bars are packed with revellers while the length and breadth of London´s Whitehall is thronged with an enormous crowd eager to slake its collective thirst, then to acclaim one of the great heroes of the hour - the Prime Minister, Winston Churchill... for he is due to speak to the mass of people who have joy in their hearts and a song in their throats. It makes for a most stirring occasion. The conflict in Europe is over, although everyone is aware that the years ahead will not be easy. Just for this one particular day they can forget their worries and enjoy one of the great days in their country´s history. Music is playing everywhere. Songs of hope, songs of sentiment; some with words looking forward to a bright future, others with a reflective backwards glance to the bitter-sweet emotions of the six long years of strife. It was a marvellous period for music. Great songs were still being written for vocalists fully capable of doing them complete justice. On both sides of the Atlantic the pre-war boom in swing and dance bands had evaporated to some extent; it was the singers who ruled in the brave new world. Vera Lynn had begun her professional career as a band vocalist, but by the early ´forties had established herself as one of the most popular solo artists in Britain. The deep sincerity of her finely tuned singing together with the memorable numbers she performed struck a chord at home and with the troops overseas. Her connection with the forces during the war has passed into the nation´s folklore. Of all the singers active between 1939 and 1945 it is Dame Vera who will forever be associated with those dark days; her records form a soundtrack to the war years. It is a tribute to Vera Lynn that her popularity has never waned, enduring to the present day more than fifty years after she recorded her big wartime hits. There´s A New World, It Could Happen To You and Jerome Kern´s beautiful Long Ago And Far Away will stir many memories. Her closest rival for the affections of the people was the much-missed Anne Shelton. When she started with Ambrose´s Orchestra as a gym-slipped schoolgirl it was hard to believe that a voice of such deep port wine resonance could come from one so young. Her sense of how to phrase and shape a song would have been considered extraordinary in an experienced artist, let alone someone only just into her teens. She was so highly regarded that, on trips to war-torn England, both Glenn Miller and Bing Crosby expressly asked her to work with them. A tremendous honour for a comparative newcomer. Just how well merited it was is demonstrated in Tonight I Kissed You and one of the only numbers to become popular in both Britain and Germany, Lili Marlene. There were other popular female vocalists besides the ´big two´. Adelaide Hall must have been one of America´s best-ever exports to the UK. Initially a wonderful jazz singer who made some classic recordings with Duke Ellington, she became an integral part of the British music scene when she moved to this country. Versatility and a fine voice coupled with a highly distinctive style were the keys to her success. Equally at home with the popular songs of the time as with mainstream jazz, her versions of the massive worldwide Julie Styne/Sammy Cahn hit It´s Been A Long Long Time and Harold Rome´s My Heart Sings are perfect vehicles for her exemplary singing. In both she is accompanied by the equally adept Norman Perry at the piano. Just like Anne Shelton the pint-sized Beryl Davis was a very young girl with a very big voice. Her teenaged assurance in I Got It Bad is a reminder of an all-round vocalist who recorded with jazz violin maestro Stephane Grappelli and with David Rose in America as well as a number of dance bands...

Anbieter: Bear Family Recor...
Stand: 22.06.2019
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Jimmy Witherspoon - Blowin´ In From Kansas City...
24,95 €
Reduziert
19,95 € *
zzgl. 3,99 € Versand

(Ace) 16 tracks - Original 1948 to 1952 ´King´ recordings Blues shouting is a dying art form in the field of rhythm & blues and is only a memory from its hey-day in the forties and early fifties. Most of its main practitioners. such as Jimmy Rushing, Joe Turner, Wynonie Harris, Walter Brown. Big Duke Henderson, are dead and gone. A few, such as Jimmy Nelson, have been rediscovered and are currently enjoying a successful comeback. One artist who has successfully straddled the last forty years in the music business is Jimmy Wither-spoon. in the forties a jukebox favourite of the rhythm & blues scene; in the late fifties and sixties a successful jazz and blues vocalist and maker of countless albums in the company of many big names in the jazz field. Spoon´s long and interesting career got off the ground in Los Angeles in the mid 40s when he made dozens of important recordings for companies such as Phillo/Aladdin, Mercury, Supreme, Swingtime and Modern. Belonging to the blues shouting tradition, which differs from its cousin country blues, Witherspoon performed in the company of jumpin´ big bands which evolved out of the territory bands of the mid and south west. This is ably described by John Tyman, in his notes on another Witherspoon album. ´For the most part these singers got their start in the Negro sections of cities such as Kansas City, Okla-homa City and other centres below or bordering the Smith and Wesson line.´ Born in Gurdon, Arkansas on 18 August 1923, Jimmy Witherspoon sang as a child in his local Baptist church choir, where his mother played piano. During his teens Witherspoon moved to California in search of work in L.A. He washed dishes until he was called up to the Merchant Marines in World War II. While serving in the Marines he travelled to the Far East. and was invited to sing with pianist and band-leader Teddy Weatherford, who had a residency at the Grand Hotel Winter Gardens in Calcutta, India. On his discharge at Vallejo California. the naval shipyard town south of San Francisco. he met up with Jay McShann whose band was on a tour of the west coast. McShann had just lost his vocalist Walter Brown. Witherspoon was auditioned and got the job. When the unit arrived in Los Angeles in 1945 they cut sides for the Mesner Brothers´ Phillo label (later known as Aladdin). Ironically they chose the old McShann and Bronco hit ´Confessin´ The Blues´. Witherspoon´s rich vocal style rapidly became a favourite with audiences of both radio and juke-boxes, his 78 rpm discs selling by the truckload. Witherspoon´s long association with the Biharis at Modern was a happy one, even in the early eighties. I met him while he was visiting Jules Bihari at his office on Normandie Ave. Jules was in no doubt about his affection for ´Spoon and said that he was his favourite blues singer. It was Jules Bihari who conducted Witherspoon´s first Modem recording sessions in L.A. in 1946. These were fronted by an all-star band led by drummer Al ´Cake´ Wichard including Jay McShann on piano. Most sessions were held at either Universal or Radio Recorders in Hollywood. Towards the end of 1947 Modern held a mass of recording sessions in an attempt to beat Petrillo´s recording ban of 1948. It was during this period that Witherspoon cut a fairly large amount of masters. Because most of Witherspoon´s Modern classics were cut direct to 16´ acetate lacquers. and later re-leased on 78 rpm discs, a wealth of good material remained on the shelf, with the exception of his big hits. Few of these lacquers were ever remastered or transcribed onto tape. The remainder of these masters were later reissued on budget-line Crown albums. The Witherspoon sessions were made with a variety of accompanists including Jay McShann. Al ´Cake´ VVichard, Maxwell Davis, Buddy Floyd and Gene Gilbeaux/Don Hill. In particular the fine guitar work of Mitchell Tiny Webb and Chuck Norris shine on various numbers on this set. The gem of a 1950 date features the beautiful tenor sax of Ben Webster on ´I´m Going Round In Circles´. I have included an alternative take to that issued on Modern 806. on which Webster´s horn is even more lyrical. Other fine recordings released for the first time in-clude ´T.B. Blues´ which dates from an early session with Al Wichard´s Sextet, which also includes Jay McShann on piano. Other lacquers revealed mag-nificent sides from a 1951 date: ´Blowing The Blues´ and ´It´s Raining Outside´. The band on these sides sounds suspiciously like Johnny

Anbieter: Bear Family Recor...
Stand: 07.06.2019
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